Poorly Locked Bikes

By | 14 June, 2013

Just for fun, I’ve collected a few images from around the internet of poorly locked bikes. Hopefully we can all learn from these mistakes!

Of course, you already know how to lock your bike

Thin cable lock

Not only is this locked with just a thin cable, but it could be easily be lifted over the top of the seat!

This cable lock is so flimsy you could probably cut through it with a pair of children's scissors!

This cable lock is so flimsy you could probably cut through it with a pair of children’s scissors!

The frame may be locked securely, but that didn't stop a thief taking the wheels!

The frame may be locked securely, but that didn’t stop a thief taking the wheels!

This is partly the fault of the rubbish bike stand, but by only locking the front wheel, the rest of the bike can be easily taken.

This is partly the fault of the rubbish bike stand, but by only locking the front wheel, the rest of the bike can be easily taken.

Always put your lock through your frame, or you might lose it.

Always put your lock through your frame, or you might lose it.

This lock is huge, and leaves plenty of room for thieves to insert tools and lever it off. Plus the poll to the left indicates the loops are pretty flimsy and can be broken off.

This lock is huge, and leaves plenty of room for thieves to insert tools and lever it off. Plus the poll to the left indicates the loops are pretty flimsy and can be broken off.

This cyclist has already lost their unsecured saddle. Plus those cast iron railings are actually quite brittle, and one good whack with a hammer will break them and release the bike.

This cyclist has already lost their unsecured saddle. Plus those cast iron railings are actually quite brittle, and one good whack with a hammer will break them and release the bike.

I think this one speaks for itself!

I think this one speaks for itself!

Author: Richard Bloomfield

Richard is the founder of Dublin Bike Blog. He commutes to work every day by bike, come rain or shine, on his Dutch city bike. You can read more from Richard on his blog richardbloomfield.ie.

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